Beach Fossils

White Eagle Hall Presents

Beach Fossils

Arthur, Hypoluxo

Sun · March 31, 2019

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$20.00

This event is 18 and over

Beach Fossils
Beach Fossils
The long-awaited return of Brooklyn’s Beach Fossils, Somersault showcases a band in bloom. Charting into new musical territory with a refined songwriting style, it’s an album that captures flashes of life in New York grounded in personal experience.

The band’s self-titled 2010 debut established a sound that was both minimal and enveloping. With Somersault, the group’s first release since 2013’s Clash the Truth, Beach Fossils have channeled years of experimentation into expansion and reinvention. Augmented with more complex instrumentation, including string arrangements, piano, harpsichord, flute, and sax, the new songs offer multi-layered pop guided by sharp, poignant, and honest lyrics.

As the band’s first release on Dustin Payseur’s new label Bayonet Records, which he co-owns with wife Kate Garcia—the group made the most of their newfound independence, investing ample time in expanding its range both musically and lyrically. While Payseur handled the bulk of the songwriting duties in the past, Somersault is a true collaboration between the founding member and bandmates, Jack Doyle Smith and Tommy Davidson. The new songs speak to a more fluid, eclectic sound, filled with lush compositions formed by studio experiments and sam-pling of the band’s own recordings.

Orchestral pop gem “Saint Ivy” shines with plucked strings, buoyant basslines and a propulsive, wayward, guitar. “Tangerine,” a driving, tightly wound melody, rushes forward and briefly leaves the ground due to the gossamer guest vocals of Slowdive’s Rachel Goswell. The effervescent “Rise,” which hinges on the spoken word of Gavin Mays (Cities Aviv) discussing a failed rela-tionship, hangs, like many recent breakups, in a sense of suspension. The cloudy, wistful “Soci-al Jetlag,” bustling with samples of crowded streets, features the type of candid, off-the-cuff lyr-ics that make the entire effort immediately illuminating.

Recorded at multiple studios across New York City, a cabin in upstate New York, and even Los Angeles (including the home studio of Jonathan Rado of Foxygen, who helped engineer part of the album), Somersault turns the newfound chemistry between the trio into a sonic tapestry. Due to the variety of sessions and recording locations, the album was a Frankenstein-like series of reworking and reimagining songs. As the group pieced together different parts in a cycle of creation and cooption, and built out more elaborate songs track by track, the process became more reminiscent of a record created via sampling and arranging than one built by simply grind-ing out riffs. The long-simmering album, filled with breezy music both melancholic and uplifting, sees the band channeling their voices and honing their craft.

Flowing between shimmering compositions and immersive soundscapes, Somersault evokes the laid-back mood of a warm, breezy city night, the air crackling with humidity and excitement. These songs pulse and pull, capturing a blend of promise and heartache. It’s beautiful and lay-ered, a refined, sweeping creation that threads together numerous styles, textures, and themes into a refreshing, singular vision.
Arthur
Arthur
“Manic” is the only word Arthur gives to describe his mindset going into recording his debut album, Woof Woof. An isolated year and a half spent in the woods of Delaware County, Pennsylvania, allowed Arthur to channel that manic energy into nothing but his most ambitious project yet, creating his own world “inhabited by a religion of my own making, like I was in a cloud, or hell, or something. Searching for charity and my own vision of morality.”

Gradyville, PA, where the album was recorded felt like being trapped in time, trapped out of time maybe. The recordings of phone calls and voice messages show a thin connection to the “real” happenings happening separately from his recording studio/parents’ house, little portholes that gave Arthur a disjointed but needed view into what was going on outside of the constructed world of his recording process.

Sometimes it is hard to give others a view into the micro-realities we create for ourselves while working on the things we love, but Woof Woof is an example of the slits in time and space that can transport the consumer directly into the mindset of the creator.

This idea of a “place out of time” seems to follow Arthur, creating little bubbles of weird and eerie truth that exist for only the people experiencing it then and there, but with this album he has created a physical representation of this skill, shedding the ephemeral nature of what it used to be. Now you can carry a transporter to the liminal world of Arthur with you at all times.

Arthur expands on this with this message to his listeners: “The best version of your reality is the one you create, the best version of yourself is not the one that exists.”
Hypoluxo
Hypoluxo
Brooklyn’s Hypoluxo, featured in Paste’s New York Bands of 2018 list, first caught our attention for their “darkly beautiful dream pop.” The ethereal vibe continues on their new record, Running on a Fence, a mature-yet-eccentric collection of sophisticated indie rock.

Latest single “Kentucky Smooth” is an elegant new wave ballad that drifts between sharp and driving to soft and sentimental. Spiky guitars accent Samuel Cogen’s nonchalant, but wholly sincere words as he sings, “I would never leave you” over a sweeping rhythm.
Paste Magazine
Venue Information:
White Eagle Hall
337 Newark Ave.
Jersey City, NJ, 07302
https://www.whiteeaglehalljc.com/